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montereybayaquarium:

Our New Arrival
The little loggerhead sea turtle hatchling rescued by our colleagues in North Carolina is now on exhibit in the Open Sea galleries.
This #TravelingTurtle arrived last Friday and it’s now settling in after its exhibit home was spiffed up a bit.
The youngster hatched in mid-August, three days after its egg was rescued as part of a routine nest excavation performed by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. The nest was located in the town of Emerald Isle, not too far from the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores, where the turtle was raised.
When it left North Carolina, it weighed less than half a pound and was just over 4 inches long.
The loggerhead that we returned to North Carolina will be released offshore in the Gulf Stream in the near future. We’ll share photos of our first #TravelingTurtle going back to the wild.
Many thanks to our friends at USAirways who expedited the turtles’ travels!
Read the saga of both Traveling Turtles.
Photo ©Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder

montereybayaquarium:

Our New Arrival

The little loggerhead sea turtle hatchling rescued by our colleagues in North Carolina is now on exhibit in the Open Sea galleries.

This #TravelingTurtle arrived last Friday and it’s now settling in after its exhibit home was spiffed up a bit.

The youngster hatched in mid-August, three days after its egg was rescued as part of a routine nest excavation performed by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. The nest was located in the town of Emerald Isle, not too far from the North Carolina Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores, where the turtle was raised.

When it left North Carolina, it weighed less than half a pound and was just over 4 inches long.

The loggerhead that we returned to North Carolina will be released offshore in the Gulf Stream in the near future. We’ll share photos of our first #TravelingTurtle going back to the wild.

Many thanks to our friends at USAirways who expedited the turtles’ travels!

Read the saga of both Traveling Turtles.

Photo ©Monterey Bay Aquarium/Randy Wilder

Photoset

thenewenlightenmentage:

Hidden in Paradise: Fascinating, Rare Dolphins and Whales You’ve Never Seen Before

Sometimes, it seems, large whales and talking dolphins get all the attention. Yes, we love these animals, too – how can you not? A humpback whale launching itself from the sea like a giant, blubbery rocket and crashing down with a triumphant spray of seafoam can impress even the most curmudgeonly of whale watchers.

But the pantheon of cetaceans includes far more than just our charismatic, coastal kin. Preferring deeper water and diving for more than an hour at a time, some species of whales and dolphins are rarely seen, and seldom studied. These animals slip stealthily between the waves at the surface and retreat into a deep blue world that we still know very little about.

It takes a determined observer to learn the patterns of a pod of dwarf sperm whales, for example, and predict where they’ll surface next.

Continue Reading

(via thescienceofreality)

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mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

No-take marine reserves make coral reefs more resilient. 
"A new study finds no-take marine reserves, where fishing for parrotfish is prohibited, may make coral reefs six times more resilient to coral bleaching and other disturbances. Parrotfish eat algae, so a reef system with abundant parrotfish is more likely to recover from disturbance rather than “tip” into an undesirable state in which algae dominate. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions also improves coral resilience, but only in the long term.
The research is the result of Dr. Peter Mumby's three-year Pew Marine Fellowship project to better understand the health of coral reefs.
"This added resilience is important because it shows that protecting parrotfish, through such measures as marine reserves and fisheries policies, increases the ability of corals to adapt to warming oceans," said Dr. Mumby, lead author of the study and a professor at University of Queensland in Australia. "In addition, it should reduce the loss of ecosystem services that reefs provide, such as support for fisheries and coastal protection from storms."
Jul 30, 2013
Pew Marine Fellows, Ocean Science Division
Contact: Rachel Brittin,
- See more at: http://www.pewenvironment.org/news-room/fact-sheets/no-take-marine-reserves-make-coral-reefs-more-resilient-85899493008#sthash.U3FUOAx4.dpuf
- See more at: http://www.pewenvironment.org/news-room/fact-sheets/no-take-marine-reserves-make-coral-reefs-more-resilient-85899493008#sthash.U3FUOAx4.dpuf
- Get the fact sheet

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

No-take marine reserves make coral reefs more resilient. 

"A new study finds no-take marine reserves, where fishing for parrotfish is prohibited, may make coral reefs six times more resilient to coral bleaching and other disturbances. Parrotfish eat algae, so a reef system with abundant parrotfish is more likely to recover from disturbance rather than “tip” into an undesirable state in which algae dominate. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions also improves coral resilience, but only in the long term.

The research is the result of Dr. Peter Mumby's three-year Pew Marine Fellowship project to better understand the health of coral reefs.

"This added resilience is important because it shows that protecting parrotfish, through such measures as marine reserves and fisheries policies, increases the ability of corals to adapt to warming oceans," said Dr. Mumby, lead author of the study and a professor at University of Queensland in Australia. "In addition, it should reduce the loss of ecosystem services that reefs provide, such as support for fisheries and coastal protection from storms."

- See more at: http://www.pewenvironment.org/news-room/fact-sheets/no-take-marine-reserves-make-coral-reefs-more-resilient-85899493008#sthash.U3FUOAx4.dpuf

- See more at: http://www.pewenvironment.org/news-room/fact-sheets/no-take-marine-reserves-make-coral-reefs-more-resilient-85899493008#sthash.U3FUOAx4.dpuf

- Get the fact sheet

(via thescienceofreality)

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mothernaturenetwork:

'Real Housewife' stars in PETA ad to free captive whaleAdriana de Moura poses in a bathtub as part of a campaign to free Lolita the whale at the Miami Seaquarium.

mothernaturenetwork:

'Real Housewife' stars in PETA ad to free captive whale
Adriana de Moura poses in a bathtub as part of a campaign to free Lolita the whale at the Miami Seaquarium.

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Dhiho’s Seahorse
Credit: Sandra J. Raredon, Division of Fishes, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.This Japanese seahorse is just over one inch (2.5 cm) long. Its curly tail can anchor the seahorse to algae or coral.

Dhiho’s Seahorse

Credit: Sandra J. Raredon, Division of Fishes, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution.This Japanese seahorse is just over one inch (2.5 cm) long. Its curly tail can anchor the seahorse to algae or coral.

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This is just insanely gorgeous. The colors. The colors…

This is just insanely gorgeous. The colors. The colors…

(Source: virtualsilence, via lovesexbeautypain)

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Video

smithsonianmag:

The Beauty Beneath the Ocean Surface

Over 70% of our planet is covered by water but it’s easy to forget how amazing the world is beneath it all. I hope this video inspires others to respect nature.

Video by: Sarosh Jacob

Ed note: How a ball of yard and the work of more than 800 people could save endangered sea life.

This is gorgeous. 

(via smithsonianmag)

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Absolutely stunning. Love the contrast of the blue and orange. 

Absolutely stunning. Love the contrast of the blue and orange. 

(via iwill-followyouintothedark)

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(Source: 200ft, via noobthought)

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Tanzania. 

Tanzania. 

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Smiles.

Smiles.

(Source: -onyourknees, via barefoot-travellers)

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Photo I took during my travels on Caye Caulker, Belize. 

Photo I took during my travels on Caye Caulker, Belize.